skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via jehovahsthicknesss)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Konstancja Nowina Konopka

A Thousand Evil Deeds

This is a story about the kids from Biskupice — a rusty-with-ill-reputation industrial district of Zabrze in the Silesian Highlands of Southern Poland.

Children from Biskupice have the luxury of freedom which their peers from big metropolities can not feel. Children from Biskupice do not have fenced play areas, and they are allowed to trample lawns. They can play football everywhere they want, enjoy adventures and secret places, and not always behave well.

Their world seem to be infinite.

This is a story about five friends who democratically share fags, chocolate, crisps and fizzy drinks. They steer clear of a bully, “Big Aneta”. These boys hate school and already two of them left it for good.

They can not start with a clean slate though. Szychta with Kalus dumped a cat off the bridge. Kalus with Bajlas devastated the local cemetery. Bajlas with Szychta set fire to an old shed. And Bajlas smashed a dinner plate on his school friend’s head.

Their world can appear fascinating with its limitless living space and imagination, but then it makes you puzzled with the moral code. This poses the question of how many evil deeds are yet to be committed to reach anticipated adulthood…

— Konstancja Nowina Konopka

These stories were very old, as old as people, and they had survived because they were very powerful indeed. They were the tales that echoed in the head long after the books that contained them were cast aside. They were both an escape from reality and an alternative reality themselves. They were so old, and so strange, that they had found a kind of existence independent of the pages they occupied. The world of the old tales existed parallel to ours, but sometimes the walls separating the two became so thing and brittle that the two worlds started to blend into each other. That was when the trouble started. That was when the bad things came. That was when the Crooked Man began to appear to David.

John Connolly, The Book of Lost Things (via observando)